thewritingcafe
thewritingcafe:


Part I: Creating a Religion
Part II: Religious Hierarchies
Part III: Pantheons, Deities, Mythologies, etc.
BONUS: Ceremonies (birth, death, naming, sacrificing, rites of passage)
This is similar to Part III, but more specific on a single deity.
BASICS
What is a deity?

A deity is a divine or supernatural being that meets one or more of the following:
Is worshiped by a population
Is given attributes and associations
Is recognized as a divine being
They are often referred to as gods and goddesses.

Your religion does not need deities.
TYPE OF DEITY
You can have different groups of deities within a pantheon of deities. These groups can be separated however you want. Perhaps one group is for all the water deities (rain, storms, fresh water, salt water, waterfalls, snow, ice, etc.) or maybe the deities are separated by hierarchy.
What you do with these groups is up to you. Deities within one group might share similarities in their appearance or behavior, or each group might have a different following of worshipers, or each group might represent something as a whole (an animal or a season, for example).
Read More

thewritingcafe:

Part I: Creating a Religion

Part II: Religious Hierarchies

Part III: Pantheons, Deities, Mythologies, etc.

BONUS: Ceremonies (birth, death, naming, sacrificing, rites of passage)

This is similar to Part III, but more specific on a single deity.

BASICS

What is a deity?

A deity is a divine or supernatural being that meets one or more of the following:

  • Is worshiped by a population
  • Is given attributes and associations
  • Is recognized as a divine being

They are often referred to as gods and goddesses.

Your religion does not need deities.

TYPE OF DEITY

You can have different groups of deities within a pantheon of deities. These groups can be separated however you want. Perhaps one group is for all the water deities (rain, storms, fresh water, salt water, waterfalls, snow, ice, etc.) or maybe the deities are separated by hierarchy.

What you do with these groups is up to you. Deities within one group might share similarities in their appearance or behavior, or each group might have a different following of worshipers, or each group might represent something as a whole (an animal or a season, for example).

Read More

allmymetaphors

I said at sixteen that I don’t believe in anything, but now
I am thinking that isn’t true. I am thinking of you,
and the dappled light on the floor of your room.
And your songs, and your jaw, and the color of the moon
before a snowstorm.

Both eighteen, we agreed that this love
was not worth waiting for. The door was locked.
I touched your skin, and wondered if it would ever happen again.

At the train station, I cry, and a stranger brings me tissues.
I don’t want to kiss you, so you leave, and my knees are weak.
There is nothing sharper than the words, “I am not what you need.”

So I preserve the last moments in amber
and build a shadow box. I settle for “he loves me not.”
And I tell my mother I’m fine, but last week
I met someone with your eyes
and had to leave the party, just to avoid him.
Friday nights, I get drunk in the bathroom
and I make a scene. My friends keep me clean.
They don’t let me call you when I am bawling on the bathroom floor.
I tell everyone I don’t miss you anymore.

And you don’t miss me anymore. And I am a whore,
and maybe I told you already, but love is a pretty heavy concept.
So I won’t say I love you. Everywhere I go I hear new
reasons to believe that I am lucky. My friends love me.

On Saturday morning I shave half my head. You will never see it.
You will never ask
how I am healing.
I was surprised to find I had been faking it all along.

Let’s Not Waste Our Time With This Anymore; Hannah Beth Ragland  (via allmymetaphors)
simple-serenade

thepaperplaneofexistence:

describing eye colors isn’t actually v helpful as a description??? talk about the makeup smeared on the left side, the lines under their eyes, the sloppily cut hair obscuring their eyes from view, how bloodshot or sunken they seem in the face, how wide they go at the slightest sound, how glassy and unblinking they seem, how they’re always darting away

all of that tells me a bit more about the character than whatever shade of gemstone they most resemble, seriously

princeloptr
siopold:

miracleyangwenli:

siopold:

the funny thing about dril posts is that they actually do have a structure to them– they hit a kind of conceptual caesura halfway through, a point where there’s no inevitable logical connection between what’s been said and what’s still to come. here, the first sentence didn’t need to result in the second, yet it’s not “lol random” either; the speaker is angry about his boss’ draconian ferret-kissing policy, and reacts in kind, and even the reference to a “screen saver” reminds us that we’re in an office. it’s a narrative progression that, despite having an internal logic, alienates its punchline from its setup. who the hell is this person?

one thing i love about @dril posts is how they all seem to take place in a universe that is somewhat like our own, but with the habitus of white middle america taken to a bizarre, absurd, but strangely logical conclusion. take this one, for instance: 

so we have our setting: a security guard protecting the american flag in the betsy ross museum, something almost archetypically american and middle class. but once again the first part, or setup, for the punchline, “fucking the flag,” careens the joke into an alien punchline that still, given the setting, makes sense. @dril’s security guard character imitates a sort-of cop-talk, the banter of a security guard, “buddy, they wont even let me fuck it”. you can imagine a similar response from a guard at any museum, but we’re talking about Fucking the American Flag, here. i really love @dril. 

it’s astonishing that a human being thinks of those posts. some person, someone out there whose existence we have to infer, because all we know is that those posts occur and they must be coming from somewhere. “the @dril​ tweeter” resonates as “the beowulf poet” does, except beowulf (which i’ve only read in translation, so i’m not an authority) has never made any use of the english language as baffling and sublime and somehow primally interlaced with the stuff of human consciousness as “IF THE ZOO BANS ME FOR HOLLERING AT THE ANIMALS I WILL FACE GOD AND WALK BACKWARDS INTO HELL.”

siopold:

miracleyangwenli:

siopold:

the funny thing about dril posts is that they actually do have a structure to them– they hit a kind of conceptual caesura halfway through, a point where there’s no inevitable logical connection between what’s been said and what’s still to come. here, the first sentence didn’t need to result in the second, yet it’s not “lol random” either; the speaker is angry about his boss’ draconian ferret-kissing policy, and reacts in kind, and even the reference to a “screen saver” reminds us that we’re in an office. it’s a narrative progression that, despite having an internal logic, alienates its punchline from its setup. who the hell is this person?

one thing i love about @dril posts is how they all seem to take place in a universe that is somewhat like our own, but with the habitus of white middle america taken to a bizarre, absurd, but strangely logical conclusion. take this one, for instance: 

so we have our setting: a security guard protecting the american flag in the betsy ross museum, something almost archetypically american and middle class. but once again the first part, or setup, for the punchline, “fucking the flag,” careens the joke into an alien punchline that still, given the setting, makes sense. @dril’s security guard character imitates a sort-of cop-talk, the banter of a security guard, “buddy, they wont even let me fuck it”. you can imagine a similar response from a guard at any museum, but we’re talking about Fucking the American Flag, here. 

i really love @dril. 

it’s astonishing that a human being thinks of those posts. some person, someone out there whose existence we have to infer, because all we know is that those posts occur and they must be coming from somewhere. “the @dril​ tweeter” resonates as “the beowulf poet” does, except beowulf (which i’ve only read in translation, so i’m not an authority) has never made any use of the english language as baffling and sublime and somehow primally interlaced with the stuff of human consciousness as “IF THE ZOO BANS ME FOR HOLLERING AT THE ANIMALS I WILL FACE GOD AND WALK BACKWARDS INTO HELL.”